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Named after the founding father of Gibson guitars, Orville H.Gibson, these fully-authorized Japanese guitars came into existence through partnershipsbetween Gibson USA and various Japanese manufacturers and dealers (such as Aria, Matsumoku and Yamano Music) that extend back into the 1970s.In 2006, Gibson ended its relationship with Yamano Music.You can research and find in much greater detail, information about the histories of these brands on other websites, but for me, the important part is to judgean instrument upon its merits.It was decided upon to use "Orville" as the new brand name, dedicating the brand to the founding father.As it was decided that someof these guitars would be equipped with Japanese-made pickups and some with USA-made pickups, they decided to include the post-script "by Gibson" for themodels that had pickups of American origin.

This is a boldstatement, I know, but when you compare these guitars to early Greco, Tokai and Aria Pro II clones, they just come up a little short in the mojo and vibedepartment.By 1982, Greco Stratocasters became Fender JV Stratocasters, then later MIJ and CIJ Stratocasters, made by the sameguys who made the Greco "Sparkle Sound," "Spacey Sound," "Sparkle Sound," and "Super Real" Stratocasters from1977-1981.Greco still retained the business of selling great Gibson clones and other brand knockoffs of extraordinary high quality upuntil 1989.At first, they didn't have the hardware to make really good, exact replicas, but by 1974or so, they had the correct-style hardware to match their excellent craftsmanship, and they put out some killer replicas.Also, Greco made more clone models of original Fenders, Gibson’s, Rickenbacker’s, Gretsch’s, Zemaiti’s, lbanez, andother brands, than all other companies combined.I've had over 100 Orvilles and Orville by Gibsons and there were exceptional examples of both model types.

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